Our Club Supports Preservation, Conservation and Environmental

Outreach Programs

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The Nauset Garden Club is a founding member of the Pollinator Pathway Cape Cod. We joined with nine Cape organizations:

The Association to Preserve Cape Cod (APCC)  ~  Garden Club of Harwich 

The Chatham Conservation Foundation ~  Nauset Garden Club

 Master Gardeners Association of Cape Cod  ~  Orleans Conservation Trust

 Orleans Improvement Association (OIA)  ~  Orleans Pond Coalition

The Town of Orleans.

  The goal is to spread the pathway to all of the towns on Cape Cod

to create a contiguous pathway.

Pollinator Pathway Cape Cod

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NEW Updated List

 

New England Plants for Pollinators

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The Concept of Pollinator Pathways

The purpose of Pollinator Pathways is to stem the heavy loss of pollinators (insects, birds, and animals) by means of creating connected corridors or pathways that support their habitat. The fragmentation of the natural environment through urbanization and suburbanization is now recognized as a major factor in the great decline of many of these pollinators. 

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How You Can Help

        o ADD a few more natives – trees, shrubs, and flowers

               o Add perennials or annuals and extend your bloom season

        o SUBTRACT a little lawn – reduce the size and mow less often

               o Consider adding more garden beds, allow a natural lawn to grow

        o AVOID chemical fertilizers and pesticides

               o Lawn and garden pesticides and chemical fertilizers

                     are not healthy for pollinators, our waters, or us

        o LEAVE the leaves – go easy on the Fall clean-up of beds

               o Pollinators overwinter in the leaves

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Creating a Pollinator Pathway will allow us all to make a difference in one of the most important ecological issues of our time.  Pollinator Pathways can be a happy mix of pollinator plants and traditional plants.

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 Pollinator Pathway Cape Cod

Register Your Garden

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POLLINATOR PATHWAY CAPE COD

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 The Nauset Garden Club's

Outreach Committee

 

If you are interested in joining the Nauset Garden Club's Outreach Committee, to participate in the Pollinator Pathway Cape Cod, contact one of the committee members below.

Outreach Committee

 

Co-Chairs

Sue Poskitt   Beth Murphy  

Email them through the

Nauset Garden Club email.

 

 

Current NGC Club Members may contact them through

their information in the Club Yearbook

 

POLLINATOR PATHWAY CAPE COD

 

Helping in our Community

Sprucing up the gardens at the Orleans Village Green

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A taste of the

HISTORY OF THE ORLEANS VILLAGE GREEN

RHODODENDRON DISPLAY GARDEN

 

The Orleans Village Green is 1.2 acres but appears larger because the Snow Library, which abuts it, sits on 2.1 acres of connected landscaped lawns. Orleans is situated in climate USDA Zone 7a. Although the Green is not on the water the winds do sweep across it. Additional soil and manure were added to the sandy Cape Cod soil to prepare the site. Superphosphate and peat moss were added during planting.


The first section of the garden was planted in the fall of 1989 and spring of 1990. The garden was dedicated in May of 1991. A sign was installed, a band played music, an Orleans selectman was present and there were refreshments for all.   THIS IS JUST AN EXCERPT. WHO KNEW THERE WERE TWO PHASES?  VIEW THE SITE PLAN AND A LIST OF PLANTS.   

                         

 

Thanks to the American Rhododendron Society  Cape Cod Chapter

OH, THOSE INVASIVE PLANTS!

A main focus in cleaning up the Village Green Gardens was to identify and remove invasive plants.  Here is some information and links so you can become more informed about invasive plants on Cape Cod.

 

What is an Invasive Plant Species?

An "invasive species" is defined as a species that is non-native (or alien) to the ecosystem under consideration, and whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human health.

~ USDA Forest Service

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     The Mass Audubon Society  has designated 31 species

as invasive to Cape Cod.

The slide show below highlights about half of them

with identification and descriptors.

Read about and view more invasives.

 

  CLICK ON ANY PICTURE TO GET A FULL  SCREEN SLIDE SHOW WITH DESCRIPTORS

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Purple Loostrife
Purple Loostrife

The purple loosestrife can grow up to 7 feet tall, but usually is about 3 to 5 feet in height. It can be spotted easily by its long stalks of purple flowers. It invades wetlands often forming dense colonies. A single plant can produce more than a million seeds. What to do: Hand pulling works for smaller populations. Repeated cutting can prevent seed production and might eventually kill the plant. Galerucella beetles have also been introduced under state supervision and have been successful.

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Oriental Bittersweet
Oriental Bittersweet

The woody vine can grow up to 60 feet long and its fruits are yellow-orange that split open to reveal a fleshy interior. After it invades areas it smothers other trees and shrubs. What to do: For young vines, hand pulling can work. So too can repeated mowing may work. When the vines mature into trees, they need to be cut when leaves aren't present and herbicide applied. Wikimedia Pepperweed A perennial herb that is native to Europe and Western Asia, it can grow up to 5 feet with clusters of

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Glossy Buckthorn
Glossy Buckthorn

This small tree can grow up to 20 feet. It has small shiny leaves and small dark fruit. It is native to Europe, Central Asia and North Africa. Birds can spread the fruit causes it to overcrowd fields, woodlands and wetlands. What to do: With small populations hand pulling works or mowing frequently in fields. For larger plants systemic herbicide at the cut stems or stump sprouts.This small tree can grow up to 20 feet. It has small shiny leaves and small dark fruit. It is native to Europe, Centr

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Purple Loostrife
Purple Loostrife

The purple loosestrife can grow up to 7 feet tall, but usually is about 3 to 5 feet in height. It can be spotted easily by its long stalks of purple flowers. It invades wetlands often forming dense colonies. A single plant can produce more than a million seeds. What to do: Hand pulling works for smaller populations. Repeated cutting can prevent seed production and might eventually kill the plant. Galerucella beetles have also been introduced under state supervision and have been successful.

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